Category Archives: Faculty Achievements

Carolyn Barber published to Child Indicators Research

Barber, C., & Ross, J. (2017). Cross-cohort changes in adolescents’ civic attitudes from 1999 to 2009: An analysis of sixteen countries. Child Indicators Research. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s12187-017-9452-0

 

Abstract: Adolescents develop civic attitudes that are shaped by both proximal and distal social contexts; in turn, these contexts change over time due to cultural and historical shifts. This study uses data from the 1999 IEA Civic Education Study and the 2009 IEA International Civics and Citizenship Education Study to assess changes in governmental trust, conceptualizations of citizenship, and inclusive attitudes toward racial/ethnic and gender equality in sixteen countries participating in both surveys. Well-fitting scales were created for each of five attitudes examined, indicating that the structure of attitudes was similar in both cohorts. While attitudes toward racial/ethnic and gender equality became more inclusive in nearly every country, patterns of change in citizenship norms and trust were more varied across countries. Gender gaps also became less pronounced over time for every outcome except for social movement citizenship, which indicated a continuing presence of gender-based norms for civic engagement.

Rhianna Thomas published to Perspectives and Provocations in Early Childhood Education

Thomas, R. (2016) Discovering our own whiteness. Perspectives and Provocations in Early Childhood Education, 3. Retrieved from: http://www.earlychildhoodeducationassembly.com/journals.html

 

Rhianna Thomas published to Perspectives and Provocations in Early Childhood Education. Perspectives and Provocations is the journal of the Early Childhood Education Assembly, which works to support and integrate the efforts of NCTE constituents concerned with language and literacy issues in Early Childhood Education.

 

 

Dr. Laurel Watson publishes to The Counseling Psychologist

Laurel WatsonWatson, L. B., Velez, B. L., *Brownfield, J., & *Flores, M. J. (2016). Minority stress and bisexual women’s disordered eating: The role of maladaptive coping. The Counseling Psychologist, 44, 1158 – 1186. doi: 10.1177/0011000016669233

 

The purpose of this study was to explore the link between bisexual women’s experiences of anti-bisexual discrimination and disordered eating, while examining potential mediating variables underlying this link: outness/identity concealment and maladaptive coping (i.e., coping via internalization, detachment, and drug and alcohol use). A total of 353 bisexual women participated in this study. The relationship between outness and disordered eating was not significant. Higher levels of anti-bisexual discrimination were related to more disordered eating behaviors, and this relationship was mediated by coping via internalization. However, anti-bisexual discrimination was directly related to more coping via detachment and drug and alcohol use. Findings from the study suggest that attending to bisexual women’s experiences of discrimination in counseling is particularly important. Moreover, assisting bisexual women in resisting internalization of discriminatory experiences may be a potential point of intervention for mental health professionals working with bisexual women experiencing disordered eating.

Dr. Michelle Maher appointed external evaluator for a recently awarded National Science Foundation grant.

 

Michelle Maher

Michelle Maher, Ph.D., professor and Higher Education Administration program coordinator in the School of Education’s Educational Leadership, Policy and Foundations division, was appointed external evaluator for a recently awarded National Science Foundation grant, funded through the Directorate for Education & Human Resources, Division of Graduate Education. During this three-year project. Maher will evaluate innovate doctoral education practices undertaken in the University of Oklahoma’s (OU) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. These practices are intended to decrease degree acquisition time, reduce attrition and support the goal of increasing scientific workforce diversity. The grant PI is Michael Ashby, Ph.D., of OU, and project updates will be posted at https://chemgraded.com/.

 

During this three-year project. Maher will evaluate innovate doctoral education practices undertaken in the University of Oklahoma’s (OU) Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. These practices are intended to decrease degree acquisition time, reduce attrition and support the goal of increasing scientific workforce diversity. The grant PI is Michael Ashby, Ph.D., of OU, and project updates will be posted at https://chemgraded.com/.

Dr. Chris Brown Published in Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling

Chris Brown

Brown, C., Maragos, A. Lee. R., Davidson, B., Dashjian, L. T. (2016) Female-to-male transsexuals: Giving voice to their experience. Journal of LGBT Issues in Counseling, 10 (1), 16-39.

 

Abstract: The authors examined the experiences of 11 female-to-male transsexuals. Participants described discomfort interacting with and having little to no shared experiences with cisgender men, which they attributed to prior socialization as women. Participants credited their posttransition life satisfaction to their positive self-identity. Pretransition, participants identified as lesbian, were active in the lesbian, gay, bisexual community, but currently lacked support from the community they had once belonged. As men, they expressed concerns about their unearned privileges and affirmed their attraction to women. Implications for counseling are discussed.

Dr. Jacob Marszalek published to the Journal of Psychosomatic Research

Jacob MarszalekClark, J. M. R., Marszalek, J. M., Bennett, K. K., Harry, K. M., Howarter, A. D., Eways, K. R. & Reed, K. S. (2016). Comparison of factor structure models for the Beck Anxiety Inventory among cardiac rehabilitation patients. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 89, 91-97.

 

Objective: Individuals with cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience greater rates of distress symptoms, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms, than the general population. These psychological outcomes have been linked to greater risk for negative outcomes following a cardiac event; however, research examining the relationship between specific components of anxiety and outcomes in CVD is limited. Further, prior research has not investigated the structure of anxiety symptoms in CVD. This study sought to compare previously established one, two, and four-factor models of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) in individuals enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) Methods: Our sample included 208 individuals with CVD recruited during enrollment in a phase II CR program. Participants completed the BAI at enrollment in CR (Time 1) and again 12 weeks later at CR completion (Time2, n=151). Results: Consistent with prior literature, 41% of our sample reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (BAI N 8), and the BAI proved to be a reliable measure within this sample (α =0.89). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) results indicated that a second-order model with four first order factors, consisting of cognitive, autonomic, neuromotor, and panic components, fit our data well. A multi-group CFA approach supported measurement invariance across time. Conclusion: These results suggest that anxiety following CVD can be evaluated based on cognitive, autonomic, neuromotor, and panic components as well as the encompassing anxiety construct.

Drs. Nash and Hollins receive a Spencer Foundation Small Grant Award

Kindel Turner Nash

Kindel Nash, PhD

Etta Hollins, PhD

Etta Hollins, PhD

Drs. Nash and Hollins, assisted by Ms. Leah Panther have been awarded a Spencer Small Grant in the amount of $47,716.00 to investigate the high-leverage practices of high-performing early literacy teachers across multiple urban contexts. Dr. Hollins’ and Dr. Nash’s previous work has called attention to the ineffectiveness of predominant literacy best practices in urban schools. Moreover, the data on academic performance do not support the reliability of these practices. At the same time, despite decades of work suggesting that culturally responsive teaching is essential to teaching all students well, schools continue to demonstrate a lack of success in educating young children of Color. These failures point to the need for more outcome-oriented research on culturally responsive, high-leverage literacy practices. While scholars have compiled 19 high-leverage practices usable across disciplines, thus far, no research has been conducted about culturally responsive, high-leverage literacy practices in early literacy classrooms. Given this, dissemination of findings from this critical ethnographic study has the potential to greatly impact the teaching of literacy in urban, early childhood contexts. Further, high-leverage literacy practices can be mapped onto teacher education programs as essential knowledge and skills that teacher candidates need in order to be quality teachers.

Carolyn Barber appointed as a visiting scholar to the Centre for Citizenship and Democracy, KU Leuven, Belgium

Dr. Barber will spend ten weeks with the Centre collaborating with colleagues on research on the role of schools in supporting youth civic and political development. She will present her own research on trends in youth civic attitudes in the first decade of the 21st century at a seminar sponsored by the Centre, and will serve as a discussant for doctoral students’ work in student seminars. She will also be presenting her research on the role of schools in the formation of youth civic attitudes at the 15th annual Belgian-Dutch Political Science Conference (the Politicologenetmaal), held in Brussels.

Etta Hollins is the recipient of the 2016 AERA Division K Legacy Award

Etta Hollins, PhD

Etta Hollins, PhD

Etta Hollins is the recipient of the 2016 AERA Division K Legacy Award. This is the Division’s highest honor to recognize extraordinary service and contribution to teaching and teacher education. Dr. Hollins will be celebrated and presented with her award at the Division K Business Meeting at the Annual Meeting in Washington, DC (April 9th, 6:15–7:45 pm; Marriott Marquis, level 4, Independence Salon E), and will also be recognized in the AERA Division K summer newsletter.

Dr. Jacob Marszalek published to the Journal of Dental Research

Jacob MarszalekGlaros, A. G., Marszalek, J. M., & Williams, K. B. (2016). Longitudinal multilevel modeling of facial pain, muscle tension, and stress. Journal of Dental Research, 95(4), 416-422.

 

Abstract: The role of masticatory muscle activation on pain in temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD) is controversial. This single-group, prospective panel study examined the relationships among masticatory muscle tension, emotional distress, and TMJD pain in a sample of 7,023 observations obtained from 171 individuals using longitudinal multilevel modeling. Three main hypotheses were tested. The first posited that emotional distress and muscle tension directly influenced pain (hypothesis 1a: Distress → TMJD Pain; hypothesis 1b: Muscle Tension → TMJD Pain). The second posited that emotional distress directly influenced muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension), and the third posited that the effect of emotional distress on pain was mediated by muscle tension (Distress → Muscle Tension → TMJD pain). We also examined the fit of the data to possible alternative models. All the data used in this study were collected via an experience sampling methodology. The fit of the preferred models was better than that of the alternative models, with the preferred models explaining large proportions of the data, especially for level 2 variance (hypothesis 1a = 41% variance; hypothesis 1b = 69% variance; hypothesis 2 = 48% variance). In the mediation model, the addition of muscle tension to the model reduced the impact of emotional distress. The findings support a causal role for masticatory muscle tension in TMJD pain. Clinically, the results suggest that addressing tension and other oral parafunctions in those diagnosed with TMJDs should be an important part of the conservative, noninvasive care of individuals diagnosed with the myofascial pain or arthralgia of TMJD.